Lessons in love

OUR school days teach us many things which remain with us throughout our lifetime – most of us probably still know our times tables, the capital of France and more than we'll ever need to about Zambia's copper mining industry.

OUR school days teach us many things which remain with us throughout our lifetime - most of us probably still know our times tables, the capital of France and more than we'll ever need to about Zambia's copper mining industry.

But lessons extend far beyond academia - they'll also provide the basic building blocks which will form our ideas of camaraderie, community and society.

Indeed, the classroom is where many of us will forge lasting friendships and enjoy our first taste of young love in the form of crushes on classmates.

It's natural, it's common, and it's been a way of life for generations - which is perhaps why parents of pupils at Weston's Ashcombe Primary School are upset to feel this development is being stifled by a 'heavy-handed' new rule laid down by staff.


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Headteacher Peter Turner has banned pupils from sending Valentine's cards. He says it's to prevent emotional trauma when these fledgling romances collapse and youngsters get 'dumped'. He doesn't want learning interrupted by heartbreak.

But who does this ruling really protect? Aren't these first, tentative steps towards romance a vital part of growing up?

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Blocking a tradition which pupils' parents tell us they think is 'harmless fun' denies the children a chance to enjoy an occasion which also helps lay foundations for their future happiness.

Wouldn't it be better for the school to embrace this tradition and use it as a basis to help educate and develop the people in its charge?

Lessons in love are vital for everyone - and surely it's better for the school to help children understand this, rather than creating a taboo around the whole idea.

AFTER weeks of uncertainty, we've now been given a definitive, irrevocable, incontrovertible answer on the future of North Somerset Museum.

Last week, it was moving 'lock, stock and barrel' to a 'bigger and better' location.

This week, it's moving - but not to somewhere bigger, and not as a complete collection.

Cllr Elfan Ap Rees told us: "Whereas before people may have thought the move would be from A to B, what I think might happen is that the move would be from A to B and C as well.

"I think that whatever replaces the museum would be smaller, but that the amount on display would not necessarily be reduced."

So that's cleared that up, then.

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