And this year's prize turnip is... Ian Lewis!

PUBLISHED: 02:52 14 December 2006 | UPDATED: 10:20 24 May 2010

AN EMPTY tin of corned beef has won the prestigious art award The Turnip Prize. Awarded to the artist who has put the least amount of artistic talent and effort into a piece, this year's prize has been scooped by Ian Lewis for his work entitled 'Torn Beef

AN EMPTY tin of corned beef has won the prestigious art award The Turnip Prize.Awarded to the artist who has put the least amount of artistic talent and effort into a piece, this year's prize has been scooped by Ian Lewis for his work entitled 'Torn Beef'. Ian, aged 69, from Wedmore, said: "I have entered this most coveted art contest on several occasions and I really feel the lack of effort this year has really paid off."The award was presented in front of a packed art-loving audience at a ceremony held in The New Inn, Wedmore. The crowd cheered when the winner stepped forward to accept the prize, a turnip mounted on a six-inch nail.Organisers said: "We are delighted with the lack of effort taken to create the work."Ian who describes his work as 'frustrating' added: "The work took no time at all to create. I fancied a corned beef sarnie, got the tin out of the cupboard, and when trying to open the tin using the allotted key, instead of cutting around the top the key decided to go off in a different direction altogether and tore a big hole in the tin".Organiser Trevor Prideaux said: "This year's event attracted a total of 69 entries, which by strange coincidence is exactly the same amount as last year. "It's fantastic that Ian has won. As a 69-year-old he is our second oldest winner and it's one in the bird's eye to the Tate's Turner Prize, which is an ageist competition. "I believe that over the last seven years the bad artists of Wedmore and surrounding areas have created far better works than Nicholas Serota and The Tate Britain Gallery could ever wish to exhibit." The exhibits from the finalists will now be sold on internet auction site eBay, with profits going to charity.


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