Classrooms condemned

STUDENTS at a Clevedon school will have to take lessons in the hall after their classrooms were condemned by health and safety chiefs. A total of 90 children at Mary Elton Primary School will have to move out of a three classroom building and be taught in

STUDENTS at a Clevedon school will have to take lessons in the hall after their classrooms were condemned by health and safety chiefs.A total of 90 children at Mary Elton Primary School will have to move out of a three classroom building and be taught in the hall and the library after North Somerset Council health and safety chiefs deemed the building unfit for use.The school, which has 420 students, celebrates its silver jubilee this year.Headteacher Owen James, who joined the school in September, said: "The triple classroom building is used to accommodate 90 children in total."After a survey earlier this year it was decided the building would last for another 12 months. However, due to the erratic weather we have had over the summer, the condition of the building has deteriorated."It is very damp in places and smells musty and in places the floor is dipping. If you stand outside you can put your hand through the wall of the building and touch the carpet inside. It really has come to the end of its useful life."Mr James said education bosses were now planning to put a new block at the school, which will hopefully be in place by next summer. Students will now be taught in the hall and library until temporary buildings are sited on the playground ahead of the new block being built.Mr James said: "We have a fantastic team of staff, governors, students and parents."Mary Elton is a fabulous school with excellent results and this old building is not an ideal learning environment - we deserve better. We will work very hard to make sure there is as little disruption as possible to the children's education during this time."North Somerset Council said it condemned the buildings after deciding repairing the classrooms would not be cost effective.Council spokesman Nick Yates said: "We had arranged for some maintenance and repairs to be carried out to three Elliott type classrooms during the half term."When the work started and the external fabric was removed, it was agreed that the buildings were in such a poor condition that spending money repairing them did not represent value for money and the buildings should be replaced."The maintenance and repair work has therefore stopped and temporary buildings will be delivered to the school to house the children while the classrooms are replaced.


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