Man to tackle 3,500km of challenges to mark 35 years since cancer diagnosis

PUBLISHED: 18:54 01 April 2019

Kevin Burgess was diagnosed with lymphoma aged 15. Picture: Kevin Burgess

Kevin Burgess was diagnosed with lymphoma aged 15. Picture: Kevin Burgess

Archant

A cancer survivor will run, cycle and swim 3,500km to mark 35 years since his diagnosis.

Kevin Burgess was diagnosed with lymphoma aged 15. Picture: Kevin BurgessKevin Burgess was diagnosed with lymphoma aged 15. Picture: Kevin Burgess

Kevin Burgess was diagnosed with lymphoma in 1984, when he was just 15 years old.

He will take part in 10 endurance events during the year which, combined with his training, will equate to the final distance total.

Kevin, aged 50 of Cleeve, will run four half marathons, his first being the London Landmarks on March 24, while he will also compete in the Portishead Triathlon on May 26, the Bristol 10K and a 50k night bike ride in July.

Kevin told the Mercury: “It was a very difficult time, reading back through old papers and doctor’s notes I received has been strange to say the least.

“The only difficulties I have had with the training aspects have been in the last fortnight as I have had the flu, which has affected how much I can do because usually I train five or six days per week and I aim to cover eight to 10km each day.

“I am nervous but excited by the challenges at the same time.”

Kevin still gets regular check ups and has an ECG scan every two-and-a-half years.

He wants to raise £3,500 for CLIC Sergeant, a children’s cancer charity which helped Kevin and his family during his illness.

He added: “My mother could go home every night while I was in hospital because of the great care CLIC Sergeant provide.

“People need to understand how treatments have advanced and changed over the years, it has moved on considerably since the 1980s, where I went back to school and carried on with my lessons with little support from doctors, but now things have changed and the support young people and their families receive makes a huge difference.

“Really it is about raising as much money for them as I can, and fortunately my son Charlie and daughter Imogen have been a huge help in spreading the word on social media.

“There are never any health implications for cancer survivors to do these kinds of physical challenges, but as a 50-year-old man who stills likes to enjoy himself there are obviously some training aspects which are tough on the body.”

To donate, click here.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Weston Mercury

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists