Headteachers question Government’s performance tables following mixed results

PUBLISHED: 12:00 03 January 2018 | UPDATED: 17:10 03 January 2018

How did your child's school do in the Department for Education's performance tables?

How did your child's school do in the Department for Education's performance tables?

Archant

A mixed bag of results in schools’ key stage two performance tables has caused headteachers to question the table’s accuracy.

The Department for Education (DfE) has released the annual tables which review the progress made by pupils in reading, writing and maths between the end of key stage one and the end of key stage two – setting an average of zero.

The DfE also analysed the attainment scores of pupils and expected 61 per cent of students at a school to score 100 in their exams.

The tables revealed just 14 of the 41 schools in the area were above the attainment average.

Churchill Primary School fell short of the national benchmark, with only 37 per cent of pupils meeting the expected standard.

Headteacher Lorraine Woolven said: “The outcomes of these assessments are well below our high expectations and in no way reflect our aspirations for our pupils.

“In the past year we have invested in resources and materials to support learning and have thoroughly evaluated all our practices.

“We have also implemented additional robust monitoring and evaluation procedures and provided focused professional development to further enhance provision. School leaders and Governors acted swiftly to bring in these improvements and I am delighted by the progress already made.”

Adam Matthews, chief executive of the Extend Learning Academies Network multi-academy trust, said people viewing the tables need to consider the number of pupils at the school, with the scores of a student from a smaller school counting for more than a larger one.

He added: “People also need to take on board the fact we are still only two years into a four-year assessment system. The children taking the tests have not had the full curriculum taught to them throughout key stage two.

“We are delighted in the progress our schools have made, especially in reading and maths and it shows the use of a broad and balanced curriculum to deliver high quality teaching is paying off.”

Kewstoke Primary School was near the top of the table, securing average progress scores and an 88 per cent attainment score.

Headteacher Sarah Harding said: “We were delighted with the results and the hard work of the children, staff and parents has paid off.”

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