Queens of Wessex make it to national final of cyber competition

PUBLISHED: 19:00 21 April 2017

The Queens of Wessex at the presentation with Miriam Gonz�lez and Ciaran Martin CEO of NCSC

The Queens of Wessex at the presentation with Miriam Gonz�lez and Ciaran Martin CEO of NCSC

Ben Davis

A group of students from a Somerset school travelled to London to become cyber sleuths last month.

Amelia Ford, Jennifer Hughes, Tilly Hallett and Sarah Moreman from Kings Of Wessex Academy, in Station Road, Cheddar, entered the 2017 CyberFirst Girls competition and made the top 10 in the country.

The group entered as the Queens Of Wessex and finished in the top 0.5 per cent of the entrants.

The girls’ security skills and code-cracking abilities were put to the test in the competition, which featured more than 8,000 girls from around the UK and was organised by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC).

It was created to raise more awareness of careers in cyber security among girls, as only 10 per cent of the global workforce in this specialised field are female.

Alison Whitney, deputy director for digital services at the NCSC, said: “The girls from Somerset were very worthy finalists. The standard of work was incredibly high and we were very impressed.”

Sadly, the girls did not bring home the trophy but were just three clues behind the overall winner.

On behalf of the team, Sarah said: “It was great to learn computer science in an innovative way and to encourage girls to get into it.”

A group of students from a Somerset school travelled to London to become cyber sleuths last month.

Amelia Ford, Jennifer Hughes, Tilly Hallett and Sarah Moreman from Kings Of Wessex Academy, in Station Road, Cheddar, entered the 2017 CyberFirst Girls competition and made the top 10 in the country.

The group entered as the Queens Of Wessex and finished in the top 0.5 per cent of the entrants.

The girls’ security skills and code-cracking abilities were put to the test in the competition, which featured more than 8,000 girls from around the UK and was organised by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC).

It was created to raise more awareness of careers in cyber security among girls, as only 10 per cent of the global workforce in this specialised field are female.

Alison Whitney, deputy director for digital services at the NCSC, said: “The girls from Somerset were very worthy finalists. The standard of work was incredibly high and we were very impressed.”

Sadly, the girls did not bring home the trophy but were just three clues behind the overall winner.

On behalf of the team, Sarah said: “It was great to learn computer science in an innovative way and to encourage girls to get into it.”


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