Glassworks clear up while future is decided

PUBLISHED: 14:45 31 May 2006 | UPDATED: 09:23 24 May 2010

EXTRA work is being carried out to tidy up Nailsea's Glassworks site - ahead of a decision being made on the future of the historic remains. North Somerset Council, which jointly owns the site with Hobbs Properties, has already carried out some scrub clea

EXTRA work is being carried out to tidy up Nailsea's Glassworks site - ahead of a decision being made on the future of the historic remains.North Somerset Council, which jointly owns the site with Hobbs Properties, has already carried out some scrub clearance and now plans to move large soil heaps from the land.The authority is also undertaking a programme of weed control.An options appraisal has already been carried out to look at the future development of the site.A total of 11 ideas have been put forward including using the land as a public open space or a car park. Other options include building a three-storey development or a mix of offices and homes.North Somerset strategic project coordinator Graham Quick said: "We are currently holding discussions with Hobbs Properties and exploring the viability of some of the options put forward in the options appraisal."In addition all grant funding opportunities are being investigated to establish if the community and open space option can be implemented."Once a viable option is identified this will be subject to further discussions with the Nailsea glassworks steering group which include representatives from the town council and local history society."In the meantime efforts and resources are being targeted at making the site more presentable."The remains of the Glassworks were identified as a Scheduled Ancient Monument by English Heritage in 2003.The principal archaeological remains on the site consist of the New House cone footings with a number of airways and swinging pits surrounding the site of the cone.The cone was 120ft tall and 68 ft wide and dominated the centre of Nailsea in the nineteenth century. The swinging pits were an important technological development in plate glass production and the cone was possibly the last to be built of its type.

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