Halloween calls down

THE number of nuisance calls received by police this Halloween dramatically decreased - down by nearly 80 per cent on last year. This year police in North Somerset received 42 calls on October 31 compared to 190 on the same night last year, which is a dro

THE number of nuisance calls received by police this Halloween dramatically decreased - down by nearly 80 per cent on last year.This year police in North Somerset received 42 calls on October 31 compared to 190 on the same night last year, which is a drop of 78 per cent.The calls that were made were to low-level nuisance such as egg throwing, minor vandalism and groups of rowdy teenagers.In the northern sector, which covers the towns of Clevedon, Portishead and Nailsea, calls included two reports of criminal damage and one minor assault.Halloween is the second busiest night of the year for local police after New Year's Eve.This year an extra 33 officers were on duty across the northern sector to crackdown on bad behaviour.The massive decrease in the number of calls has been welcomed by police bosses who say next year they hope to get even better results.North Somerset Police Sector Inspector Steve Date said: "We are delighted to have seen such a dramatic drop in the number of calls."We had a large number of additional staff on duty in the sector on the night which has had a real impact."The North Somerset Times teamed up with local police to launch the Be Safe, Be Seen At Halloween campaign in the run up to the scariest night of the year.As part of the campaign, which came under the umbrella of the force's Operation Relentless, police community support officers visited schools and youth clubs to hand out a special street code card advising youngsters how to behave and stay safe when out trick or treating.The newspaper also published a poster, which was sent out to around 33,000 homes, for people to put in their windows asking trick or treaters not to call.A Halloween party was organised at Waitrose in Portishead in a bid to keep youngsters off the streets with face painting and a fancy dress and colouring competition.Inspector Date added: "The campaign in the North Somerset Times really helped promote what the force was doing to crackdown on antisocial behaviour."The posters which were published in the newspaper were displayed in many windows across the area. "Our staff have also visited licensed premises and stores across the district to advise them not to sell eggs, flour or fireworks to young people at this time of year."One person who did not get away unscathed on Halloween night was North Somerset Superintendent Julian Moss.Supt Moss was out on patrol in Clevedon when an egg was thrown at his back.


You may also want to watch:


Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter