Picture Past: Nigerian king visits Weston-super-Mare in July 1, 1966 edition

PUBLISHED: 07:00 05 July 2016

The retirement of Mr. Charles Cox (pictured), head guide of Cox's Cave, Cheddar, has meant the end of the family link with the man who discovered this world famous tourist attraction in 1837, Mr George Cox.

The retirement of Mr. Charles Cox (pictured), head guide of Cox's Cave, Cheddar, has meant the end of the family link with the man who discovered this world famous tourist attraction in 1837, Mr George Cox.

Archant

Noisy councillors, a shortage of blood donors and a visit from a hereditary king from Nigeria were all featured in stories in the Weston Mercury and Somerset Herald.

Norman Vaughan with the dancing chorus of the Norman Vaughan Show which opened its season at Knightstone Theatre this week.Norman Vaughan with the dancing chorus of the Norman Vaughan Show which opened its season at Knightstone Theatre this week.

The visit by the Oba, a hereditary King of Lagos, in Nigeria, was going to keep Weston Town Councillors busy. He was due to visit Weston, along with his consort, and three members of the Lagos Town Council. It was his second visit to Weston, and he was also expected to Visit Blagdon before travelling to London.

* A survey was being planned to assess Weston’s traffic problems. The town was facing a growing population, higher rates of car ownership, and difficulties to find car parking spaces.

* Donkeys were to be allowed to operate on the beach on Sunday mornings. At the time, they were only allowed to work afternoons under the licensing conditions.

* Axbridge Parish Council was accused of making too much noise when they left their meeting. A complaint had been received by the Women’s Institute, which met in a room below the one used by the council.

* Damage estimated to be 
around £70 was done to Christ Church. It was found in ‘absolute chaos’ with organ music ripped to pieces and a substance poured over a Bible.

* The Government was expected to hold up plans in Weston for a library to be opened in The Maltings in Worle.

* A shortage of blood donors in Weston was expected to become an ‘acute problem’. Stocks were being used up faster than they could be replenished.

* The retirement of Cheddar Cave’s head guide Charles Cox meant there was no longer a family link at the attraction to the man who first discovered it. George Cox first leased the caves in the 1800s, and his son and grandson both worked at the caves. Cox’s cave still exists in 2016.


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