Vandals shatter 'respect' aspiration of villagers

THE 'jewel in the crown' of a newly renovated village park that was found cruelly vandalised has been restored to its former glory. A £30,000 18-month revamp of Glebelands park off High Street, Yatton, finished earlier this year and organisers hoped by ma

THE 'jewel in the crown' of a newly renovated village park that was found cruelly vandalised has been restored to its former glory.A £30,000 18-month revamp of Glebelands park off High Street, Yatton, finished earlier this year and organisers hoped by making the park more attractive it would reduce persistent anti-social behaviour and vandalism.But soon after the park opened, the centrepiece of the project, a sculpture containing decorated stained glass called the Rainbow Stone, was found in tatters.The colourful glass was smashed by a group of thoughtless vandals - exactly the type organisers had hoped would learn to respect their new park.But thanks to a generous donation, a new leaded stained glass window has been installed. The work was completed free of charge by Sam Powell of Wells Cathedral Stonemasons and made by glass expert Peter Lane.The colourful glass panel was put inside a trefoil-sized hole in the sculpture, which reflects the detailed stonework on nearby St Mary's Church. There are 17 animals carved into the sculpture, all wild species found in and around the village.Faith Moulin, project co-ordinator, said: "The Rainbow Stone is the jewel in the crown of Glebelands Park."We are so grateful to Wells Cathedral Stonemasons for donating such a beautiful sculpture to our village."People were so disappointed when the glass was vandalised, so we hope the new, improved version will be around for people to enjoy for many years to come."As well as improving lighting and making the park more accessible, volunteers planted flowers and created a wildlife garden in the park.Railings, footpaths, bollards, walls, steps and the old flagpole have all been renovated and a sculpture was created from two tree stumps by a local artist. Handmade iron seats and arches were also put in place.


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