Wartime mystery lives on as pilot passes away

A FORMER pilot whose plane has been linked to one of the biggest mysteries of World War Two has died. Victor Gregory, of Locking, began serving with the 149th squadron bombers in 1940, flying the legendary Lancaster aircraft. In December 1944, Mr Gregory'

A FORMER pilot whose plane has been linked to one of the biggest mysteries of World War Two has died.Victor Gregory, of Locking, began serving with the 149th squadron bombers in 1940, flying the legendary Lancaster aircraft.In December 1944, Mr Gregory's crew had to abort a bombing mission to Germany due to heavy cloud cover. At the same time, famous 'big band' leader Glenn Miller was on his way to give a Christmas Day concert in Paris for allied troops. But his RAF Norseman D-64 plane never made it across the English Channel.Mr Gregory's only child, Henry, this week revealed the plane his father was on could not land until it had jettisoned its bombs over the channel.He said: "Because the bombs the plane was carrying were so heavy it could not land with them on board, so the plane had to fly to a jettison area. The navigator and several other members of the crew actually witnessed a Norseman go down. A historian has checked all the information available and Glenn Miller's plane was the only one of its type in the area at the time. The likelihood is he was blasted into the sea by the Lancaster."There were many theories about Glenn Miller's death but this is the only one accepted by the Glenn Miller society."After the war, Mr Gregory met Brenda who he married in 1949. They moved to Harrow in north London in 1950.Mr Gregory later became an operations officer for British Rail in the western region and travelled as the officer in charge on the royal family's train when it was in the area.Mr and Mrs Gregory retired to Locking in 1978, where Mr Gregory lived until his death. He was a regular member of the congregation at St John's Parish Church in Lower Church Road, Weston.

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