Wildlife rescue service in need of building materials for treatment centre

PUBLISHED: 16:00 29 June 2020

Snowflake the otter cub found in Combwich keeping warm at Secret World.

Snowflake the otter cub found in Combwich keeping warm at Secret World.

Pauline Kidner

The rescue centre announced it is in need of materials such as cement, cladding, bricks, flooring, insulation, windows and fibre cement materials

Secret World's treatment centre will cost an estimated £850,000.Secret World's treatment centre will cost an estimated £850,000.

A wildlife rescue centre has made a plea for donations of building materials to build a state-of-the-art treatment centre.

Plans for the treatment centre have been set back by the coronavirus pandemic.

A Kingfisher undergoing assessment at the Secret World Wildlife Rescue centre.A Kingfisher undergoing assessment at the Secret World Wildlife Rescue centre.

Secret World Wildlife Rescue in East Huntspill has had to put on hold plans for two new structures, deciding on just phase one of the builds.

However, the rescue centre announced it is in need of materials such as cement, cladding, bricks, flooring, insulation, windows and fibre cement materials.

Owner, Pauline Kidner estimates total costs to be around £850,000 though the charity runs solely on donations and sales from its store, which has ceased trading since lockdown in March.

Pauline said: “The new treatment centre is integral to the standard of work we can carry out.”

Currently, Secret World carries out work in portacabins, something Pauline believes is stagnating the level of help available to the surrounding wildlife.

She said: “Working from portacabins means that they are not effective on utilities.

“There is a lot of electric used because they are not insulated, which means the conditions are either too hot or too cold.

“The treatment centre will bring better conditions for animal care as well as working conditions for staff and volunteers.”

A small business grant has supported Secret World throughout the pandemic, though lockdown has benefited some creatures in North Somerset.

Pauline said: “Sedgemoor awarded us with a £10,000 small business grant which was immensely appreciated with the loss of takings from our charity shop as well as dwindling donations.

“If anything, wildlife has benefited from the lockdown with less pollution and cars on the road. Of course, with fewer people moving around some injured and orphaned animals will sadly not have been found.

“There has been an increase in wildlife such as birds as people have been at home to see fledglings leaving nests.”

The rescue centre encourages people to get in touch regarding injured wildlife.

Pauline added: “Somerset has one of the most diverse populations of wildlife in the country. We are always happy to give advice, our number is 01278 783250.”

For more information on the work carried out by Secret World, log on to www.secretworld.org/


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