‘Positive’ Worle youngster wins Child of Courage Award

PUBLISHED: 07:58 15 December 2018

Aiden Hunt has been nominated for a Child of Courage Award at the 2018 Somerset Awards, pictured dad Steve, mum Su and sister Jessica.    

Picture: MARK ATHERTON

Aiden Hunt has been nominated for a Child of Courage Award at the 2018 Somerset Awards, pictured dad Steve, mum Su and sister Jessica. Picture: MARK ATHERTON

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The family of a Worle youngster have praised their son’s bravery after he won a Somerset Award.

Aiden Hunt has been nominated for a Child of Courage Award at the 2018 Somerset Awards, pictured with his family.    

Picture: MARK ATHERTONAiden Hunt has been nominated for a Child of Courage Award at the 2018 Somerset Awards, pictured with his family. Picture: MARK ATHERTON

Aiden Hunt took home the Child of Courage prize at a ceremony in Yeovil on December 6.

He was diagnosed with a left thalamic region brain tumour in the spring of 2016 when he was only eight years old, just one week after his mother was given the all clear following breast cancer.

Aiden with his child of courage award. Picture: Su HuntAiden with his child of courage award. Picture: Su Hunt

He underwent a 15-hour operation at Bristol Children’s Hospital to remove the tumour and remained there for four months, separated from his dad Steve and sister Jessica.

The operation left him with a weak right side and a third nerve palsy of the right eye, meaning it is permanently closed.

Aiden Hunt has been nominated for a Child of Courage Award at the 2018 Somerset Awards, pictured with his family.    

Picture: MARK ATHERTONAiden Hunt has been nominated for a Child of Courage Award at the 2018 Somerset Awards, pictured with his family. Picture: MARK ATHERTON

Following regular MRI scans, it was discovered in 2017 the residual brain tumor had not been destroyed.

The family was torn apart again, and Aiden had to go to the United States for three months for radical proton beam therapy, but more than £8,000 was raised to help fund their expenses.

Aiden, now aged 11, continues to have three-monthly scans and is undergoing operations to try to open his eye under the care of Great Ormond Street Hospital, but he now has learning and physical difficulties.

Proud mum Suzanne told the Mercury: “We are very proud of Aiden – he is a very down-to-earth boy who does not let anything get in his way, and his fantastic sense of humour has shone through.

“All of us enjoyed a fantastic evening. We have been through a lot of turmoil together, so, to celebrate such an incredible achievement was very special.

“All the other tables stood up and gave Aiden a round of applause when he collected his award, which he did not expect.

“Throughout his journey, he has always remained positive, keeping his dry sense of humour and inspiring all he meets.”

Priory School student Aiden wrote a poem in August, which helped him express his feelings after being subjected to bullying.

The family’s friend Anna Flint nominated Aiden for the award.

She said: “His family have been through so much over the past few years.

“He has taken the transition to a large secondary school, with lots of strangers, in his stride.

“All he wants is to be like all the other kids, playing football and making friends, which can be hard for him, as he gets tired easily.”

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